Touring South Africa
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TOURS :
Israel,   Jordan,   and   Egypt MANDELA  REMEMBRANCE -TOUR -- NAMIBIA,    BOTSWANA,
     and to    VICTORIA FALLS
-- DISCOVER SOUTHERN
    AFRICA -
our exciting series!
Namaqualand wild flowers West Coast Hiking -tour -- KRUGER NATIONAL PARK
   safaris and The Panorama
3 Days Tour 4 Days Tour 4-5 Days Tour -- JHB, SOWETO & PRETORIA Half Day Tours Gold Reef City Pretoria City Soweto Lesedi Cultural Village Rhino & Lion Park / Wonder Caves Sterkfontein Caves / Maropeng Lion Park Maropeng Vistors Center -- HARTBEESPOORT
    & MAGALIES
Full Day Magalies, Hartbeespoort Elephants/Cheetahs, cable way -- SWAZILAND, KwaZulu Natal,
    BATTLEFIELDS
3 days Swaziland 8 days Swaziland, Zululand, Battlefields, Drakensberg -- ZIMBABWE, ZAMBIA,
    BOTSWANA, NAMIBIA
-- VICTORIA FALLS   and
  Chobe National Park, Botswana
-- PILANESBERG & SUN CITY Full Day Tour 3 Day Tour -- CAPE TOWN /
    GARDEN ROUTE
Full Day Tours 3 Day Tour 4 Day Tour 4 Day Spectacular   ----> CONTACT US   -- TOURING ABROAD from
    SOUTH AFRICA
Israel,   Jordan,   and   Egypt
South Africa Fundi


Newsletter January 2017

A new tour to Namaqualand for 2017! We fly to Cape Town from Johannesburg, Gauteng Province, to join our guests boarding our luxury tour bus (coach) to the West Coast and Namaqualand. After 6 days, we arrive back in Cape Town, where the guests from Cape Town end their tour, and the guests from Johannesburg board the Premier Classe train the next day to Johannesburg, arriving back after 8 days touring.

We cover an even larger region of wild flowers in this wonderful flowery part of the world. Did you know that the Cape Floral Kingdom is the smallest of the 6 floral kingdoms in the world, but with the most variety of Species? Yes, and we invite you to join us as specialists in this region.. Endemic species are magnificent attractions, and we know where to find them...

On our home page, you now have a direct link to our facebook page. We post mainly beautiful pictures and videos on there - no unnecessary chats, so it will not be intrusive for you as a friend on our facebook page. Go befriend us!

Exciting future developments are in the pipeline, so be sure to visit us periodically.


Newsletter March 2016

Not long ago Touring South Africa returned from yet another successful Namibia tour... the land that relaxes you and makes you friendly as well, while you bask in the ample sunshine, and photograph every unique opportunity of the endless horisons and interesting sites and vistas. Namibia is the second least dense populated country in the world. Come experience it with Touring South Africa, the touring company operating from South Africa.
Another successful journey through Africa!

A visit to the south of Namibia brings you to the Fish River Canyon (second in size to the Grand Canyon of the USA), and the quaint harbour town of Luderitz, where you visit the ghost town of Kolmanskuppe, and look out for the wild horses of the Namib Desert...
The Namib is best experienced in the vicinity of Sossusvlei, a photographic paradise of colour and space...

Walvis Bay and Swakopmund brings you to the Atlantic Ocean once again, and entice you with adventure and let you step into old-world German charm.
The ride through the Namib up north and inland brings you to mountainous sites of ancient rock paintings, old world cultures, and green pastures.

Etosha National Park harbors the wildlife you need to see in their natural environment -- Touring South Africa takes you there. Book your tour now. We know the best times of the year to visit Namibia (and any other part of Southern Africa, where we tour to)

Social Media developments worldwide bring information, like this website, closer to you, our guests, which makes it easier to communicate on different platforms, like email, facebook, whatsapp, etc. Touring South Africa is constantly extending our reach to be inside your phone for you to easily connect and reach out to. Booking a tour with us is extremely easy. Just contact us on any of the many links that invite you to CONTACT US !

The reach of the touring services of Touring South Africa extend into Europe and Israel. We welcome our guests to a tour or two, for holidaying to any of these destinations.


Newsletter April 2015

During the last year, Touring South Africa has gained a tremendous advantage as one of the leading tour operators from Pretoria, South Africa - on Trip Advisor we are currently ranked in the top 2 positions. For that we are extremely grateful for all your comments about our services. Thanks to our great guests, we are continuing on a successful journey through Africa!

The recent extension of our services and tours includes a tour to the beautiful Kingdom of Lesotho, with its breathtaking scenery and friendly, relaxed people, who are good agriculturists, while their handicrafts abound.


Newsletter May 2014

Touring South Africa has recently added PayPal as a means to securely pay for the services we render as Tour Operators in Southern Africa. It is more trusted than a normal credit card payment, since our clients' credit card details are not disclosed to the service provider. They feel safe that fraud is curbed this way. More than a 100 million customers all over the world use PayPal.

In South Africa, PayPal is administered by First National Bank (FNB), one of the leading banks in South Africa, especially in terms of newly developed and updated technology.

The addition of our Mandela Remembrance tour was a welcome extension of our commitment to bring our guests the latest in popular tourist excursions in Southern Africa. On this tour, you visit, in addition to the Soweto experience and the Apartheid Museum, also the historic Liliesleaf farm.


Newsletter Nov 2013

This year during August and September 2013, the five tours that Touring South Afrika / Toer Suid-Afrika made to Namaqualand were a feast, thanks to our guests, who were so enjoyable, interested, and blessed with an abundance of wild flowers, in carpets of colours, all on a remarkably long season! Our hosts, wherever we visited and stayed, were a delight. Our train journeys were luxurious and relaxing, on time and well organised. Hylton Ross provided our luxury coach, and we all enjoyed our Coach Captain, Ashley, tremendously.

Touring South Africa feels blessed with so many people who made it an absolute pleasure to tour the Namaqualand region.

Once again, the LUXURY experienced with our accommodation and on the Train, proved that Touring South Africa keep up the exceptional and persistent quality that we are known for.

We already take bookings for next year's extravaganza of the magnificent Wild flowers in the Namaqualand region of South Africa. Contact us on touringsouthafrica@gmail.com

NAMIBIA came to the fore strongly as a destination of choice:
We updated our tour offerings, and now include a Namibia South tour, Namibia North tour, and a tour of the Far Northern region of Namibia, passing the Caprivi, through the north of Botswana, all the way to Victoria Falls - an adventurous safari which includes the Skeleton Coast!

Join us for a Journey into Africa..

The different tours are coming together in different series, and the DISCOVER SOUTHERN AFRICA -series is extended with the latest itineraries for Namibia and Botswana. Have a look at NAMIBIA, BOTSWANA, and to VIC FALLS


Newsletter Sep 2012

During August and September 2012 our Namaqualand tours were once again a huge success -- the flowers were abundant, and our guests had a wonderful time.

An outstanding feature of our tours, is the LUXURY experienced with our accommodation and on the Train, which proved to be well in demand, and one of the exceptional and persistent qualities of Touring South Africa.

Book your tour well in advance for next year's extravaganza in the magnificent Wild flower region of South Africa, by contacting us on touringsouthafrica@gmail.com

CONTACT US NOW!

Newsletter July 2012

Quoting partly from: South African National Parks' publication, Kruger National Park Herald, which reported in May 2012

"Poaching War takes off"

The War on Poaching has gained new ground with the introduction to service during June 2012, of a brand new Ultra-light Bantam Aircraft, for service in the northern part of the Kruger National Park. Together with R 1 374 327 worth of donated equipment which was accepted by the Park's Ranger Corps from the SAN Parks Honorary Rangers, it will enhance rangers' ability to deal with rhino poaching,.

The Bantam Aircraft will be used by the Ranger Corps to patrol the 2 million hectare Kruger National Park (KNP).

At the handover event at Shingwedzi, KNP's Managing Executive, Mr Abe Sibiya, commented that "Our anti poaching teams can no longer only patrol on foot, bicycles, motorbikes or vehicles; but must be able to conduct aerial patrols armed with sophisticated field equipment in the huge areas under their responsibility day and night,"

In the first five months of 2012 alone, the rhinos poached in South Africa had already exceeded 235.

The SANParks Honorary Rangers from various regions, also donated the equipment inside the hangar, and contributed to the operational cost of the Bantam to the value of R 100 000. Equipment included torches, night vision goggles, thermal binoculars and scope mounts, which will all be used during patrols and other vital anti poaching work in the KNP.

"A Jeep for Anti-Rhino Poaching"

A brand new Jeep Sahara Unlimited 3.6 V6, valued at approximately R450 000, was also donated to South African National Parks (SAN Parks) by Sandown Motor Holdings Group. The vehide, obtained through the West Rand Honorary sponsorship initiative, was accepted by SANParks CEO, Dr David Mabunda on Tuesday 29 May at SANParks Head Office in Pretoria. The vehicle will be used by the anti-poaching patrol teams in the Kruger National Park.

Dr Mabunda said "this gesture has shown your patriotism for our beloved country. Your involvement through this sponsorship signifies a constructive approach in the fight against rhino poaching and is highly gratifying. It is indeed worrying that we are still losing such a high number of rhinos but the increasing number of successful arrests, and steeper sentences imposed on convicted criminals, is encouraging."

The KNP has arrested 38 suspected poachers until May 2012, "thanks to the increased cooperation from ordinary members of the public, and corporate South Africa, joining the fight against rhino poaching."

Members of Corporate SA, who donated the equipment and vehicles, and the SANParks Honorary Rangers, commented that "the protection of the environment is everyone's responsibility and critical for the existence as human beings" and that "this is yet another important tool in the fight against poaching. The bleeding has to stop sooner than later."

Source: Kruger National Park Herald, May 2012 edition


Quoting from: South African National Parks' publication, Kruger National Park Herald, May 2012

"Kruger looses two of its Tusker Legends"

"Sadly, Kruger National Park lost 2 of its tusker legends towards the end of 2011: Mashangaan (one who speaks Shangaan) in September, and Duke in October 2011.

Both these tuskers were well known in their respective areas and were amongst some of the most photographed of all the named tuskers, preferring the well inhabited tourist areas of the Kruger National Park.

Mashangaan:

The long and cold winter of 2011 was particularly rough on well known tusker Mashangaan, his condition had been declining for several months, and it was feared that he would not survive to see another spring/summer. He was in very poor condition in the weeks leading to his death, and his gait had become laboured and he seemed to be struggling. His carcass was discovered by Sgt William Ndobe of the Letaba Section on the 2nd September 2011, on the S69, close to the Hlanganini spruit and no more the 5km from his favourite walking grounds of the Letaba Camp site. No signs of struggle were found and upon seeing how worn his teeth were, it was agreed that his death was natural and could be attributed to old age. He was estimated to be between 53 and 57 years of age.

Mashangaan was named in honour of retired Regional Ranger, Mike English, who had a notable career in the Kruger National Park, starting in 1963, until his retirement in 1992.

Mike was well known amongst his colleagues for his fluency in the Shangaan language, earning him the name 'Ma-Xangane'. Mike continued his efforts in conservation after his retirement, and remained in the Kruger Notional Park as the caretaker for THEBA in Pafuri, until 1996. Mike's conservation legacy continues through his eldest son, Don English, currently the Regional Ranger for the Marula South region.

Duke:

Duke will always be remembered by many as one of, if not the most well known, recent tuskers in Kruger Park. Because of his good nature, he found himself the topic of many documentaries, as well as the well know forum 'Duke quest'. A very docile elephant, he was always happy to be photographed and was often seen on the well travelled tourist roads of the Marula Region.

Duke had sadly broken both his tusks, the first in 2007, and in 2008 by the time of his death, fortunately with quick action from the Crocodile Bridge Section ranger and his staff, both broken pieces of ivory were recovered.

Duke's carcass was discovered by the Crocodile Bridge section ranger, Neels van Wyk, after concerns that the signal of the radio collar, which was fitted in 2010, had stayed in one place over several days. The carcass was discovered on the Makambeni Spruit on the 6th October, and the collar showed his last movements on the evening of the 1st October. No signs of struggle or fights were seen by Neels van Wyk, and the death was determined to be natural causes, Duke was estimated to be between 52 and 55 years of age at the time of his death.

Duke was named in honour of section ranger Thomas Duke, and the Duke waterhole, which he was know to frequent. Thomas Duke started his conservation career at the relatively late age of forty, in the then Sabie Reserve. He served with distinction as Ranger in the Lower Sabie area of the Kruger National Park between 1903 and 1923.

Kruger's legendary tuskers continue to thrive, and approximately 16 tuskers have been identified and named as emerging tuskers. It is hoped that they will continue to develop and contribute to the unique population of 'Great Tuskers'."

To learn more about the current named emerging tuskers in the KNP, go to http://www.sanparks.org/parks/kruqer/elephants/default.php

Source: Kruger National Park Herald, May 2012 edition


Newsletter May 2012

Touring South Africa recently launched a new tour series, see

DISCOVER SOUTHERN AFRICA

The tours in the series will be updated and added on to, and promise a new exciting way of planning ahead an interesting exploration of the Southern African region.

"You can explore the BEST of South Africa and beyond, covering the sub-continent in different stages, by doing these different tours in the series.

These tours are ideal for the visitor who has 'done it all' before, and want to do something different, or for those who want to discover the Southern African region in stages, covering the highlights, and including much more.

By planning ahead, you can now budget for the most amazing tours to different parts here in our world on the southern tip of Africa. We are bringing you the best, on new routes explored, and compiled specially for the discerning traveller on a budget. Combine any of these tours to form a longer tour."


Newsletter July 2007

The Kruger National Park (KNP) recently lost three of its emerging tuskers in two weeks to fights for dominance. It is expected that they have been fighting with other bulls for dominance.

Mambrr was found by field rangers Mr Difference Mabunda and Mr Olsado Mulhovu while patrolling an area south of Tshokwane on April 30. At first, the carcass was believed to be that of Duke, another Kruger tusker, but Tshokwane section ranger Mr Steven Whitfield took photographs which were sent to KNP elephant expert Dr Ian Whyte, who identified the carcass as that of Mambrr. It is unlikely that this elephant died of starvation as the molars were still present, but it is believed he died from wounds suffered in a fight.

The second to be discovered dead was Mashaghadzi on May 10 by Shingwedzi section ranger, who found the decomposed carcass near Shingwedzi. Initial evidence from the wounds on the carcass suggests that this tusker was also involved in a fight with another bull and eventually died of these wounds. Mashaghadzi was named after a windmill just south of Shingwedzi, where he was often seen and photographed.

The third emerging tuskerís carcass was found by Mooiplaas section ranger, on May 14 after a visitor reported a dead elephant along the S144 (a long gravel loop road between Mopani and Shingwedzi camps). This one also showed signs of having been involved in a fight with another bull and the carcass was identified as that of Massunguine. The sad fact about Massunguine was that he was relatively young for his tusk size and could have grown to become one of the parkís great tusker legends.

INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT ANIMALS:

Did you know that Spotted Hyaena females are considerably larger than the males. Females are also masculinized due to having more testosterone in their bodies than most male hyaenas. As a result, females dominate the social hierachy, are more aggressive and have a penis like clitoris. Also, their vulva is fused to look like a pseudo scrotum and testes, making it extremely difficult to determine the sex of a hyaena.

 
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